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Oral history interviews CD-ROMs

Object Type: Folder
In Folder: DDX1840



Title
Description
Date

Originally deposited as a CD-ROM. Public access copy available on Preservica: https://eastriding.access.preservica.com/ (Search 'DDX1840/12/14')

2012

Originally deposited as a CD-ROM. Public access copy available on Preservica: https://eastriding.access.preservica.com/ (Search 'DDX1840/12/20')

2013

Originally deposited as a CD-ROM. Public access copy available on Preservica: https://eastriding.access.preservica.com/ (Search 'DDX1840/12/19')

2013

Originally deposited as a CD-ROM. An oral interview by South Cave U3A with Wendy Elliott. There are three sections to the interview Public access copy available in Audio-Visual room. Section a Duration: 58 mins Section b Duration: 29 mins Section c Duration: 3 mins 15 sec Timing: Action on film (00:01) Wendy is asked by the interviewer for her full name and details (00:19) Her full name is Wendy Edwina Elliott. She was called Edwina after her grandfather Edwin. Her maiden name is Cousens. She was born on 6.10.33 at The Bungalow which was on Water Lane, but the address was just The Bungalow, West End, South Cave. Her father’s name was Thomas Hedley Cousens. The Cousens family has lived in South Cave for many years; they have been able to trace the family tree back to the sixteen or seventeen hundreds. Her father was the Secretary of the National Farmers’ Union. It was probably a voluntary position initially, but became a paid post once the union became involved in insurance. She was about 6 years old when he got the job. Before that they had been farming on rented a farm near Barnsley (04:56) Her mother’s name was Dora Cousens, nee Nothard. The family lived in Reedness and her descendants lived in the house she now lives in, which is why it’s called Marshland House. Her Great Aunt Lottie who was also related to the Cousens family, lived in the house. She was Lottie Dennis and Wendy’s grandfather’s wife was Mary Dennis that was the link. They were farmers that bred Hackney horses (07:00) She has two sisters Doreen Noel Cousens now Wells, who was born on Christmas Eve. She arrived two months early and only weighed 2lbs. The second sister is Kathleen Irene Cousens now Renfrew. The two sisters lived next door to each other for a time (08:45) Her parents lived in The Bungalow until she got married in 1958. Hedley Close in South Cave is named after her father. Wendy and her husband Norman moved to the Old Vicarage now called The Priory. They shared it with Norman’s parents for about a year. They moved again, in 1960, to Marshland House when their first son Andrew was about 3 weeks old (10:36) Wendy has three sons, Andrew, Mark and Timothy, who all live locally. Andrew lives in Wesley Close, Mark in Jobsons Close and Tim on Westwood Road in Beverley. None of them wanted to farm and there was no family farm to inherit (11:50) She had a friend in West End called Jean Smith. Eileen Underwood nee Dunkin lived in half of the Manse that was next door. She was two years older than Wendy (12:54) School Days Life in Water Lane, then called Elleker Lane. The Bungalow was the last house on the lane so it looked over fields. On the right hand side of the lane there were lots of tall trees and on the left there was a paddock which was always getting water logged. During the war they had a number of evacuees and some stayed in a Romany caravan, which Wendy remembered got stuck in the field and couldn’t be moved. There was always a steam roller at the corner of Annie Med Lane and Water Lane (15:02) They would play in the fields around Annie Med Lane. Blues Farm had land to the right of Annie Med Lane with a big barn. One of the Blues’ sons used to climb on the roof of the barn and give a commentary on what he could see, which was quite amusing. There were two big ponds in fields on the left hand side of Annie Med Lane one on either side of the fence. The farmer at West End Farm, Jack Brown, kept his cows in that field and they were brought down twice a day to be milked (17:30) During the war, in the 1940’s there were tanks in Bull Field where there were ramps built into the slope. The REME (Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers) were stationed in South Cave and they would carry out manoeuvres around the field. They would march from the Castle down to the dump twice every day at 8am and 5pm (see more at 21:42) (19:18) Wendy went to Mr Brown’s regularly to collect milk in cans. It was a bit scary coming down Water Lane in the dark, as there were no lights. She was always frightened someone might jump out. Mr Mew grew very large artichokes on the right hand side. The blacksmith’s shop was on the corner of Water Lane and West End. Mr Mew’s barn came right up to the blacksmith’s shop and his house was next door to the Harrisons (21:42) War.There was a pond on the left hand side of the slope up to Bull Field where they used to find tadpoles. During the war they were told not to pick up odd pieces of metal because they could be personnel bombs (23:36).McDonalds of the Isles, who now live at Rudstone, had a Romany caravan with wooden wheels and oak panelling inside. An officer’s wife with her daughter stayed in it during the war while the officer was billeted at the Castle. The officer’s father lived with Wendy’s Great Aunt Lottie in Marshland House. The little girl was called Jean and was about 2 or 3 years old. She was found screaming on the top step of the caravan because she couldn’t find her Mum. It was about 2am and they were not sure where her Mum was. The family had probably been bombed out of their house in Hull. Families came to South Cave if they had lost their houses or to have proper sleep without worrying about the bombing (26:43).Shops.All the families’ shoes were taken to the cobblers to be mended. The shop was where the paper shop is at West End. The cobbler held the tacks in his mouth. Mr Hornsey was the tailor, in the wooden shed that eventually became a fish shop. He used to sit cross legged on the counter. A girl called Louie Carr was a dressmaker and she lived in one of the cottages in West End. They are no longer there; they were where the doctor’s surgery used to be. Louie would make dresses for them and was trained by Madame Clapham in Hull. Madame Clapham was very well known, she was a Court dressmaker, making the dresses for ladies when they appeared at Court. At Chertsey Museum they have a dress made by Madame Clapham. Louie was very friendly with Wendy’s sister Doreen. They would draw an idea for a dress and then she would make it (29:06).When she was 10 Wendy had music lessons with Mrs Jowett at the corner of Northfield, Joyce Jewett. When she was about 11 or 12 she went on to Mr Rossington, who lodged with Howard Smith. The dentist was Mr Goreham. She remembers a visit to the dentist being awful her teeth weren’t very good, she didn’t like injections. When she was about 21 she went to Hull and had her teeth completely removed, replacing them with false ones. This was before she was married. People often had teeth replaced with a false set, sometimes as a 21st birthday present (31:35).School.She started school at South Cave when she was 5. When you opened the door of the Girl’s School it smelt of coke as there were steps down to the furnace room just opposite the entrance door. The Infants School had another door round the back; it had a coal fire. The teacher was Miss Kathy Johnson and the Upper School teacher was Miss Florence Dennis, both qualified teachers. Later on Barbara Dennis would help out. She was Tom Dennis’s daughter, but she wasn’t qualified (34:08).Wendy remembers that there was a concrete wall round the school with metal bars above, which was to prevent balls going onto the road. The toilets, earth closets, were across the yard. They were told not to jump the beck by Miss Johnson, so they would hide until she left and then they’d have jumping competitions (35:50).As a child she would have worn a liberty bodice. When she went to school in Goole she wore a gym slip. There was a scholarship to go to St Marys School in Hull but only two girls from South Cave passed, one was Mary Scott. Her parents paid for her sisters Doreen and Irene to go to Goole Grammar School; it was fee paying at that time. During the week Dorothy lived with an aunt in Reedness and came home at weekends. When the two of them were at Goole they caught the train at Brough. Wendy only used the train for about a year. There was an entrance exam by the time she went and it was no longer fee paying, but was supported by the Council, who also probably paid for transport. By the time she was in her second or third year Fosters Silverwings bus took them to Goole. (38:50).Wendy’s mother made many of their clothes. They all did a lot of sewing. In wartime they had coupons so to make the most of them they bought felt for a skirt because it was cheap. They also knitted items, but nowadays it’s not much cheaper to knit than to buy a jumper (39:40).Her mother had a weekly routine and Mrs Donkin who lived next door used to help with the washing. They had a roast dinner on Sunday; her mother was a good cook. Wendy remembers paraffin lamps, as there was no electricity. There was no bathroom (40:40).She went to school in Goole at 11 years old and finished at about sixteen. She then went to Woods College in Hull to do shorthand and typing that was the type of course girls did. She worked in the Probation Service and eventually became secretary to the Chief Probation Officer in Hull. It was in New Cross Street and she was employed by Guild Hall (43:06).When she was about 12, her sister Doreen played tennis at the Radcliffe’s house as they had a tennis court. Brian Copley, Bob Farthing and Evie Dennis also used to play. After the soldiers had left the Castle, they went to play there, on two hard courts where the swimming pool is now. It was owned by the Carmichaels at that time. They started to save money so that they could sew grass (46:25).They also laid a privet hedge that was donated by someone from Brantingham. They borrowed Mr Carr’s little horse and cart and piled the pieces in. Eventually the horse was lifted off the ground and the cart broke (47:35).They also played table tennis at South Cave Youth Club. They had a Drama Club. Jack Cross persuaded Janet Copley and herself to be Youth Club representatives and they went to Hull YPI for competitions (49:29).Wendy remembers King Georges playing field with swings at the bottom of the hill. A sand pit backed onto the cow shed belonging to the Halls. At the top of the field there was a cone shaped round-a-bout, which they would jump on and off. Wendy played there but used to be accompanied by one of her sisters as it was at the opposite end of the village. It cost a halfpenny by bus from Market Place to West End (51:55) Before she was married Wendy got a bus at West End. Norman, her future husband had a dog called Tim and dogs roamed freely at that time. One day she got on the bus and the dog got on with her and sat in the seat behind. She had to pay for the dog and let it off at Market Place (52:55) While she was at Goole High School she can remember an air raid shelter at Pinfold. She caught the bus to school there with two boys from Elleker, a Needler and a Stabler, who left their bikes in her garden. The air raid shelter was made from brick with a concrete roof. It had a kind of entrance to shelter from a blast and a toilet at one end. Her father had a chicken hut for an air raid shelter. He dug it into the ground and covered it with earth, but the first winter it flooded, so they used to shelter under the mahogany kitchen table. A bomb fell near Mill Farm and Everthorpe that knocked out the windows of the Co-op; it was a large blast (56:55) A number of Hull children were evacuated to South Cave. One Christmas they were performing a nativity and a confident seeming city girl was chosen to play Mary, but she got stage fright at the last minute and couldn’t do it Section a ends at 58 minutes DDX 1840-12-17 Section b (00:07).This second session opens with a question about the Carmichaels and whether Wendy knew them. She replies that she knew them a little and remembers that one of them was killed on a tractor. Someone mentions that it was Jean and that they lived in The Lodge (01:08).On being asked whether she got pocket money Wendy replied no, if she wanted some money she just asked for it, it wasn’t a regular payment. She spent money on sweets in Carr’s shop (01:40).1947 was a very bad winter with a large snowfall and Wendy remembers Italian prisoners of war in Beverley Road. One of the prisoners was a sculptor and they made figures in the snow on Station Road. Her sister Doreen remembers going to see them (03:19).She doesn’t really remember the Abdication, but she was told by her mother that as a small girl she would lift up a glass and say “Mrs Simpson” (03:47).There was a South Cave Pageant when Wendy was a young girl. She has photos of her and her two sisters dressed as flowers in the Castle grounds. She was a daisy and Doreen and Irene were red rose and pink rose. Her Dad was dressed as an ugly sister in Cinderella (05:25).As a teenager she joined the Youth Club and table tennis club. Stan Daniels ran the Youth Club; they would go on holidays, she one was to Scotland. They also went to Bournemouth, the New Forest area. Norman, her husband, was in charge and he was only about two years older than them. About sixteen of them went and she remembers seeing glow worms (06:36).The Youth Club was held weekly in the Church Institute. They played table tennis, darts and performed plays. U3A has copies of the programmes of the plays that were performed (07:45).Guides and Brownies She was a brownie but can’t remember who ran the pack. You had to go to Brough for guides. She went to stay with a cousin in Doncaster, who was also a brownie, so she went to visit her pack. This started a correspondence between the Doncaster and South Cave brownies organised by the Brown Owls (08:50) The Church She was in the choir; there were about 12 to15 members. Her Dad was a member along with Eleanor Tomlinson and Mr Arthur Smith, the butcher. Mr Charlesworth or Charlton was the organist. The choir was usually there at morning service. There were plaques of the 10 Commandments on the side of the altar; the Creed and the Lord’s Prayer were on the right. They’ve since been removed. They went round the village carol singing (10:19) There was a confirmation class taken by Mrs Graham, but she doesn’t remember a Sunday School. When she was in her early twenties after she had met Norman but before she had children, she was a Sunday School leader (13:36) Transport She used trains and buses, travelling to work on the bus. She caught the ten minutes to the hour which took an hour as it travelled all round the villages. Although she never used the South Cave train she remembers her Dad using it to go to work (15:12) Characters in the village There was a man in the village whose nick name was Spink. He used to live with Jack Brown and his wife at West End Farm. He’d drive cattle down Water Lane and you would see him with his horse and cart. He was an exceptionally good artist although it was not known who his father was and he was a bit ‘simple’ (17:01) Frank Jude who worked at Parkside Farm, was an amusing chap. When people were making fun of him because he couldn’t get up the hay stack and he had to be helped up, he was cross about needing help so he said he’d get down and get up again by himself. He once fell into the beck with a new scuttle. Miss Butterfield and the Addisons are mentioned by the interviewers, but Wendy can’t remember them (18:48) Dr Thompson was the doctor when she was born. She didn’t go to a dentist until she was working. She remembers a time when her mother combed her hair with a small toothed comb over newspaper on the table, presumably because she had nits. There were a number of evacuees at school so there were three to a desk and it was suggested that they brought the nits into school (21:01) Alsie Cross was the hairdresser in the village; Wendy and her mother had their hair done there (22:00) Changes in the Village Street lighting and deep drainage were brought into the village probably in the late 50’s. Previously they had earth closets. It was a long time after before gas was introduced (23:08) There have been changes to Wendy’s house. One end may have been a barn in the seventeen to eighteen hundreds. It was one up and one down at the other end. Her great great grandfather’s sister enlarged the house in about 1815 as the family got bigger (24:58) Chestnut Villa belonged to Edward Cousens her grandfather. The house was all one in her grandfather’s time but it’s now divided into three, two at the front plus a flat at the back. Jack and Jean Kent’s house was built in the garden (26:00) A discussion follows about a place in a photograph that they are having problems identifying Section b ends at 29 minutes DDX 1840-12-17 Section c Section c continues the description of The Priory formerly known as the Old Vicarage (00:03) The main house had a big hall and three main reception rooms. There was a separate area that contained Norman’s grandmother’s kitchen and utility room. Wendy’s kitchen was near the front door, it had been the Butler’s Pantry, so it had a sink. Their bedroom was up the back stairs and at the top there were two bedrooms on their side. One of the three reception rooms was their sitting room. There were four bedrooms off the main staircase and a bathroom, so originally there were seven bedrooms. There was also a garage and a stable. The people who now own it call it the Old Priory and are making a number of changes Section c ends at 3 minutes 15 seconds Public access copy available on Preservica: https://eastriding.access.preservica.com/ (Search 'DDX1840/12/17')

2013

Originally deposited as a CD-ROM. Public access copy available on Preservica: https://eastriding.access.preservica.com/ (Search 'DDX1840/12/16')

2013

Originally deposited as a CD-ROM. Public access copy available on Preservica: https://eastriding.access.preservica.com/ (Search 'DDX1840/12/21')

2014

Originally deposited as a CD-ROM. Public access copy available on Preservica: https://eastriding.access.preservica.com/ (Search 'DDX1840/12/22')

2014

Originally deposited as a CD-ROM. Public access copy available on Preservica: https://eastriding.access.preservica.com/ (Search 'DDX1840/12/18')

2013

Originally deposited as a CD-ROM. Part a. Timing: (01:10) Alan Page tells us his name and his date of birth - 21 Mar 1924. He was born in Newbald, at home. (One of the female contributors to this recording is possibly his daughter, Susan.) (01:37) His father's name was either John Henry or Henry John. He was also from Newbald. (02:03) His father was a joiner. Alan Page, his father and his grandfather ran the village joiner's shop. (02:32) Alan's grandfather died in 1935. (02:48) As there was not much work between the wars, his father went to work for Goodwill [a building company]. (03:00) His father got Alan Page a job there as a bricklayer. (03:07) Mr Page's mother's maiden name was grace Emma Walker. She was also from Newbald. Her family ran the local Post Office from about 1890 until the 1970s. (04:00) Alan Page was brought up in Newbald. He finished top of his school and left at the age of 14 in 1948. (04:53) He travelled by bicycle from Newbald to his job with Goodwills at Cave. George Goodwill was the businessman who ran the company. (05:32) Goodwill's yard was where Dr [Stores-Fox] had once lived. (06:36) George's brother Tommy did more of the actual building work, George was the administrator. (06:59) The Goodwill company ceased working in 1961 or 1962. (07:13) Alan Page left the company in 1960. (07:24) George Goodwill had died in 1942 (07:36) The Goodwill's house was let furnished for a while after this. (07:43) Tommy Goodwill lived at Mill Hill in South Cave, sometimes called 'Frog Hall'. (08:22) The Goodwills were general builders. They subcontracted out work to other trades such as plumbers and electricians, but they had their own bricklayers and joiners. (09:04) An earlier Tommy Goodwill built St Mary's Church at Broomfleet, in 1860. (09:46) Reg Mason was a bricklayer's apprentice at Goodwills. (10:28) Alan Page lists the three principal joiners at Goodwill: Percy [Longrick], Alan's father and Harry Taylor. Albert Adamson was a bricklayer. (11:39) They began work at 7.30 in summer and 8 o'clock in winter, and finished at 5.00 in summer and 4.30 in winter. (12:16) Everyone bicycled to work. After the war some employees, including Alan, got motorcycles. (12:34) Alan's bricklaying apprenticeship was 7 years. There was a gap while he served in the army during the war. (14:02) His wages were about 18 shillings a week when he started. This rose to half a crown an hour. (15:14) Alan was trained by Frank [Meshaw] while acting as his labourer. (16:37) Goodwills' work was mainly in South Cave, although they did work for Major Carver at North Cave, on his house The Croft. (18:04) Goodwills had a wagon which was requisitioned by the army during the Second World War. It was left at Dunkirk. (18:58) George Goodwill ran a Rover car with a trailer. He died at the beginning of the Second World War, and the company struggled on without him. (20:00) Goodwills built Middle Garth, off Beverley Road in South Cave. (21:37) Tommy [Dewett] and Ted Sylvester joined them as apprentices [at around this time.] (22:52) Goodwills had very little machinery. They did not have a cement mixer or any other machinery until after the Second World War. (23:28) They used bricks from Broomfleet and pipes from Newport. A lot of their building materials came from Douglas Williams in Beverley. (24:59) They also worked on Cave Castle when Mrs Radcliffe lived there, after the army had occupied it. (25:42) Mr Carmichael did up Cave Castle before the [Second World War], although he only ever lived in the Lodge. (26:07) Goodwills knocked down the servants' quarters at Cave Castle for Mr Carmichael in 1938. (27:24) Alan Page says that there was supposed to be a tunnel at the back of the Church, on the Castle side. (28:14) The tunnel entrance was just through the gate at the back of the Church. (29:20) Alan Page left Goodwills in 1960. After this he was always self-employed. (30:23) Goodwills swapped premises with Dr [Stores-Fox] before Alan Page began working there. Originally Goodwills were based in what was called The Manor House. (31:38) Henry Wilson, another builder, built a [housing] estate in his yard, which also went through Goodwill's top yard. (32:10) Alan Page says that it was easy starting work on his own as there was lots of work about. (32:46) Alan had Harry Johnson working for him as a labourer, Graham [Curley] as a bricklayer, and Don Mason as a joiner. (34:22) Mick [Tennison's] father also worked with Alan Page, as did Ray Dykes from Newbald. (35:01) Alan Page never built a whole house, but he carried out many alterations and extensions. He did a lot of work for Mr Stanley and Mrs [Hellier]. (36:45) They got the stone for Mr [Hellier's] extension from Joe Rotherham, a stonemason. (37:54) Sheila, Alan Page's wife, did his paperwork for him. (38:59) Alan Page says that the nature of his work didn't really change over the years, but there were gradually more rules and regulations. (40:55) In 1977 he worked on the clock tower of All Saints Church, South Cave, installing a clock there. It tended to stop in heavy winds, so it was later replaced by another builder. (42:41) The clock was funded by money left over from the Queen's Silver Jubilee celebrations. Mike Morton was one of the young people involved. (43:39) Alan Page often worked with a joiner called John Morton. (43:53) Alan Page built the brick pillars for the gates at the back All Saints Church, South Cave. The gates there are in memory of Vicar James Victor Elliot. (46:04) Mr Wade at the Dower House in [South Cave] gave Alan Page a lot of work. (47:26) Alan Page moved to South Cave in 1950, the year he got married. He lived in a bungalow at 91 Beverley Road, which was made of asbestos. (49:46) Mrs Ratcliffe sold the bungalow to Alan Page in 1958, after renting it to him previously. (51:35) Alan Page built many extensions to the bungalow when he owned it. There are two houses on the site now. Mr Coates of Quinton Homes bought the bungalow from him. (55:00) In 1942 Alan Page was called up. He failed his second medical and could only serve in this country. Alan served as a driver at Nostell Priory and also at the Aldershot Arena, which was full of army vehicles. (58:27) He was demobbed in 1946. (59:20) Alan Page's grandparents had a Post Office at Newbald. His future wife used to go for rides on their [postal delivery] cart when she was a little girl. As a child, Alan once refused to ride with her. He met her as a adult at a dance in Hotham. Her maiden name was Sheila Packford. (1:03:08) Cliff Leake was the name of the plumber Alan always employed. (1:03:23) Alan used Mr Barlow from North Cave as a electrician. (1:04:04) When Alan worked at Goodwills he had a Ford van to get to and from work. (1:04:32) When Alan left to work for himself, he used a trailer with his van. (1:04:47) His first proper vehicle was a BSA three-wheeled car which he got in 1948. (1:05:31) Alan had a Norton motorcycle. When he married Sheila in 1950 they went down to London on it. (1:07:16) Opposite their home on Beverley Road was a big house, where Miss Kingston lived on the ground floor and Mr and Mrs Macturk lived on the first floor. (1:08:06) Miss Kingston loaned the Pages her car to take their daughter Susan to her christening in 1960. (1:08:42) Sheila Page used to clean for Miss Kingston and the Macturks. (1:09:13) The big house had beautiful bluebells in the garden every spring. (1:09:39) When Susan Page was a child she often spent time with Miss Kingston. (1:10:03) The Macturks were local solicitors. Part b. Timing: (00:14) Alan Page explains that he had two brothers, John Roland and Kenneth Walker. (00:41) His brothers worked as joiners with their Uncle Will. (00:58) Roland went to work at the Blackburn Aircraft [factory]. (01:06) Alan Page's mother worked in the Accounts Office there, before she was married. (01:23) She had travelled to work on the bus with Roland Page. (02:26) They are looking at an old photograph of Alan's bungalow at 91 Beverley Road. (03:03) At one time, Alan Page was doing some work on his bungalow, and it was so cold that their goldfish froze in its bowl. (03:39) They are looking at some other photographs of Cave, and mention the following names: Mrs Platt, Amanda [Rackham], [Leslie] Cooper, Sarah Holroyd, Diane [Gillett] and Cheryl May. (04:27) They discuss [Goughton] Thorley who lived in Cleeves Avenue. (05:19) They recall some relatives called Hodgson who had a building company in South Cave. (06:15) They are looking at a photograph of a rocking horse which had been in their family for many generations. (06:57) They discuss some holidays snaps from when they stayed in Harold Craven's caravan in Primrose Valley. (07:49) They look at some photographs of Goodwills working on Cave Castle. Public access copy available on Preservica: https://eastriding.access.preservica.com/ (Search 'DDX1840/12/15')

2012

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